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Typogram of a Jazz Musician, 1965 - Claude Bellegarde

Typogram of a Jazz Musician
1965, 63½ x 51 ins
oil on canvas
IBM collection, New York

meditation cubicle 1965 - Claude Bellegarde

Meditation cubicle
1965, 18½ x 24½ ins
oil, aluminum foil, collage on wood

Typograms1963–1967

Typogram of Lucien Bodard 1965 by Claude Bellegarde

Typogram of Lucien Bodard
1965, 25½ x 34 ins
gouache on paper
Private collection

In 1963, I tackled the psychological portrait; strictly speaking, the ‘typogram.’ The particularity of each color would correspond to a character trait. The dominant hue would be its principal predisposition. Was the final phase of the adventure in white heralding a transformation or rather the breaking through of a psychological impasse, to the very limits of life ?… CLAUDE BELLEGARDE: JOURNAL

RAYMOND ABELLIO « TYPOGRAMMES » ANDRÉ SCHOELLER GALLERY, CATALOG PREFACE, PARIS 1966 (extract)

The ambition of Bellegarde’s typograms is not to produce portraits of the body, but of the soul–and even, if possible, of the mind. The face of any living being, man or woman, is often no more than a mask. Here, the artist projects onto the canvas, in meticulously composed and arranged areas, colors that act and react, symbolizing the subject’s inner being on every level: physical, psychic and mental.

JACQUES LASSAIGNE BLUMENTHAL GALLERY, CATALOG PREFACE, PARIS 1963

Bellegarde also conducts a real alchemical investigation by taking color to the point of incandescence, in order to extract the elemental forces to which the viewer will respond, perceiving the waves that are emitted, their irradiations and magnetism. His new paintings arrive like colored spears ripping space apart, like a sign, and transfiguring the opacity of matter.

PIERRE RESTANY « LES TYPOGRAMMES DE BELLEGARDE » REVIEW QUADRAM, 1963 (extract)

Bellegarde’s originality lies in the artistic synthesis he has succeeded in operating. This brillant result is not the product of a sudden revelation but of a slow conquest of consciousness, a lucid development of instinct at every stage of the painter’s work.

Jean-Jacques Lévêque review Cimaise, 1963 (extract)

Bellegarde’s modernity resides in his knowledge and use of the objective laws of color and sound, to purposes that are never experimental but truly expressive. Hence this lyricism, powerful and uncluttered, clear and hard; the musical stridency that exalts the eyes and confers joys in proportion to our times

…Psycolor cubicle, space sculpture, enclosed territory in which the individual is recharged at the sources of his or her own identification. Man regenerates himself via this chromatic symbolism that issues from the composition of light. I began to draw a few models inspired by the typograms. Referring to the physical schemas of these people, I constructed a module of nesting forms in which the body could accommodate itself by adopting a lotus position CLAUDE BELLEGARDE: JOURNAL